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OBAMA WAGES WAR ON BEHALF OF LABOR UNIONS


OBAMA WAGES WAR ON BEHALF OF LABOR UNIONS

 

The good news is that the National Labor Relations Board has postponed the date by which employers must post an Employee Rights Under the NLRA poster from January 15 to April 30.  Of course, the postponement was at the request of the federal judge hearing the complaint brought by various employer groups to have the posting enjoined completely.

 

The bad news is that Obama continues to take an extreme pro-labor position when it comes to the membership of the NLRB.  The Constitution requires that presidential appointments to the NLRB must be confirmed by the Senate.  A president may by-pass the process by appointing the nominee to the position for a term that must expire at the end of the next Senate session.  A president usually does this when he believes that his nominee will not be able to garner the approval of the 60 votes necessary to end a filibuster.

 

Last Spring, Obama, unable to get his appointment of Craig Becker through the Senate, used the recess-appointment process made him a Board member which would have an expiration date of the adjournment of the Senate at the end of the calendar year.  Becker was the first appointee to the NLRB in history who came directly from an in-house position with a labor union, in this case the Service Employees International Union.  At about that time, the President’s nomination of Mark Pearce (D) and Brian Hayes (R) were confirmed.

 

With a three to one majority of pro-labor members on the Board, the NLRB has issued rules, proposed rules and made decisions that have helped union organizing and increased the power of labor unions.  With the expiration of Chairman Liebman’s (D) term in August and the expiration of Becker’s recess appointment at the end of the calendar year, the Board was left with only two members and, due to a 2010 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, the Board became unable to decide cases or issue new rules.

 

On December 14, 2011, Obama announced his intent to nominate Sharon Block and Richard Griffin to the Board.  On December 19, 2011, all 47 Senate Republicans sent a letter to the President asking him not to make Block and Griffin recess appointments because to do so would violate the long history of appointments being negotiated between the Administration and the Senate to come up with individuals at least palatable to both parties.  On December 19, 2011, 11 Republican Senators also wrote Obama asking that he withdraw the nomination of acting General Counsel of the NLRB,Lafe Soloman, to the full position of General Counsel. 

 

On January 4, 2012, Obama officially ignored the Senate Republicans and made recess appointments of both Block and Griffin (along with Terence Flynn (R)).  If the appointments hold, the Board will be at full strength with two Republican (presumably pro-business) and three Democratic (presumably pro-labor) members.

 

Both Block and Griffin can be expected to pick up right where Leibman and Becker left off since they are of the same philosophical cloth.  Block came from the Department of Labor where she had been the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Congressional Affairs.  Prior to that, Block had been the Senior Labor and Employment Counsel for the Senate HELP Committee where she worked for the late Senator Edward Kennedy.  Reports have been circulating  that Block was the center of the current proposal by the DOL to severely restrict the definition of “advice” for the purposes of required reporting to the DOL of union prevention activities.  Under the proposed rule change, virtually every non-employee, including attorneys, who provides assistance to a company to preserve its union-free workforce would have to report all financial payments and arrangements for those activities to the DOL for publication on the DOL website.  In the words of Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis, “she will be sorely missed” by the Department of Labor.  Solis supported the Employee Free Choice Act and is one of the most vocal advocates in government for organized labor.

 

Griffin is the second person to be placed on the NLRB directly from a labor union (Becker being the first).  Griffin was the General Counsel for the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE).  Since 1994, he also has been on the board of directors for the AFL-CIO Lawyers Coordinating Committee. 

 

Actions have already been filed to block these recess appointments, as well as that for the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  The challenges have been on the basis that the Senate technically has not gone into recess, because every three days since Christmas a senator has appeared in the chamber to gavel a session into order and, with no business to conduct, within a minute, gavels the session closed.  Technically, the filings assert, because the Senate is not in recess, no recess appointments can be made. 

 

Of course, if the suits are successful and the appointments are held to be invalid because the Senate is not in recess, will Craig Becker still be a member?

 

Stay tuned.

 

At a minimum, businesses cannot expect any relief from the barrage of pro-union actions and decisions by the NLRB, particularly those that assist unions in their organizing efforts.  Since one of the changes that has already occurred may cut the time between a petition and election by as much as half, employers who wish to remain union-free must continue to hone and implement their Rapid Response Plans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 

DID THE BOARD BLINK?


DID THE BOARD BLINK?

 

On June 22, the National Labor Relations Board published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking as the first step in its massive overhaul of election procedures.  This overhaul was obviously calculated to advantage organized labor’s organizing and disadvantage employers who wish to remain union free.

 

Between June 22 and August 22, the Board received over 65,000 comments and heard testimony from 65 witnesses, many, if not most, objecting to the proposed rule changes.

 

On August 23, then Chairman of the Board, Wilma Liebman’s term expired, leaving the Board with only three members, Democrats Becker and Pearce and Republican Hayes.  At the end of the current legislative session, Becker, a recess appointment, will have his term expire.  Upon the expiration of Becker’s term, the Board will lose the quorum (three) required for decisions and other official actions.  In short, the Board will be out of business.

 

Two weeks ago, the Board gave notice that it would issue a modified set of new rules governing election procedures on November 30, to beat the deadline before it loses its ability to act due to a loss of quorum. 

 

Hayes threatened to resign before November 30, claiming that the contemplated action was without his knowledge or participation in the process of determining what the new rules would be.  His resignation would deny the Board the legal ability to adopt the new rules because it would cease to have the necessary quorum.

 

Today the Chairman of the Board, Pearce, released the details of the rule changes that will be presented for final adoption tomorrow.  Hayes has not resigned and, in light of the lateness of the hour, it is unlikely that he will resign.  Consequently, the Board will have a quorum and the proposed rule changes in the Chairman’s Resolution will become final with Pearce and Becker passing them over the expected dissent by Hayes. 

 

In short, they rule changes that will be made final tomorrow are of only minor moment, especially when compared to what Becker, Pearce (and previously Liebman) and organized labor really wanted.  It appears that Becker and Pearce blinked in the face of Hayes’s threatened resignation and have deleted almost all of the most controversial changes that were proposed in June. 

 

The new rules will:

 

1.   Give the Board’s hearing officer the authority to limit evidence introduced at a representation hearing only to what the officer believes is material to whether a question of representation exists.  Issues ancillary to that question, such as those having to do with supervisory status or other questions challenging the eligibility of some employees to vote may not be permitted and certainly will not be allowed to delay the process.

 

2.   Give the hearing officer the authority to deny requests to file a brief on an issue raised at a representation hearing where the officer believes that a brief is not necessary to assist in making a decision on whether a question of representation exists.

 

3.   Delay the review of issues that are excluded by the hearing officer at a representation hearing until the post-election hearing, when, presumably, most would have been rendered moot by the election.

 

4.   Delete from the existing Rules the provision that provides for additional time between a representation hearing and an election to permit petitions to the Board to review decisions by the hearing officer.

 

5.   Permit appeals to the Board from decisions made at a representation hearing only in extraordinary situations where the appeal would otherwise evade review.

 

6.   Give the Board discretion to hear appeals in representation cases, regardless of whether the decision from which the appeal is taken is pre or post-election.

 

Not included in the rule changes to be finalized tomorrow (November 30) are the most controversial changes proposed on June 22:

 

·                     Electronic filing of petitions

 

·                     Requirement that representation hearings must be held within 7 days from the date of the notice of the hearing

 

·                     Requirement of a position statement at the outset of a hearing

 

·                     Preclusion of issues for trial post-election that were not included in the position statement filed at the representation hearing

 

·                     Inclusion of email addresses and phone numbers on voter lists

 

·                     Reduction in time for providing the voter list to the union from the current 7 work days to 2 work days

 

 

Chairman Pearce emphasized in his press release today, however, that the additional changes are still on the table and “remain under consideration by the Board for possible future action.”  Stay tuned. 

 

While the Board can be criticized for making decisions that do not reflect the real world, this much we now know – they have learned the definition of “hard bargaining,” thanks to Brian Hayes.

 

Even though the threat of the Board using its rule-making authority to tilt the field favorably in the direction of organized labor apparently has subsided for the time-being, we should be keeping a wary eye on Lafe Solomon, the General Counsel, and other actions the Board may take that do not rise to the level of formal rulemaking.  For example, the current guideline for Regional directors that elections must be held within 42 days from the date of a petition, absence extraordinary circumstances, is not part of any formal rule.  It is a guideline that can be changed without a lengthy hearing or comment process. 

 

Because of the continuing threat that the Board, either through its members or General Counsel, will take some action that will prejudice the ability of employers to combat union organizing, employers who wish to remain union-free should be doing those things now that are designed to neutralize and combat any appeal that a union may have to its employees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 

James Redeker

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The opinions expressed on this blog are those of the author and are not to be construed as legal advice.